The ultimate hack.


An article this week in India’s Economic Times newspaper reported on a formal complaint lodged with the Delhi police of sexual harassment from an employee of The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) against one of its directors, a certain RK Pachauri, who also happens to be the chairman of the IPCC. Obviously there’s no conflict of … Continue reading

In the aftermath of AR5.


AR5 or the fifth Assessment Report on global warming was published last week, amid a fair amount of fanfare but nothing compared to what it would have been like in the glory years of climate alarmism. Everyone has had their say on it by now but I thought it worth adding my own thoughts. What … Continue reading

Armageddon Report No. 5.


The IPCC is about to issue AR5 or its fifth Assessment Report on global warming, but since these successively more alarming reports always predict a looming end of the world as we know it, I prefer my own interpretation of the acronym. It’s going to be a tough gig for the Cassandras of climate for a number … Continue reading

The real doh! about Doha.


Well, here we are again. It’s November and that time of year for the annual international conference on figuring out ways of saving us all from global warming. Since the last one was called COP17, this one rather unsurprisingly is called COP18. Incidentally, COP stands for Conference of the Parties, which considering the great shindigs that … Continue reading

Climategate 2 – yes, they’ve been lying to you.


You’re appalled, you’re outraged, you’re stunned and you’re angry about the whole climategate emails thing. And now you’re most likely out here in the blogosphere because the mainstream media in the country you live in is either not mentioning them at all or have relegated it to a small-print footnote at the bottom of page … Continue reading

The death of journalism and the irresistible rise of the blogosphere.


The IPCC has screwed up again. They published a claim last month in their renewables report saying that renewable technologies could supply 80% of world-wide energy needs by the mid-century. What they actually published was an executive summary of the report, not the report itself. That was published a full month later. The summary or … Continue reading